SVT Play: All Systems Operational Normally

Watch Online Jay Myself

(212) 7.0 79 min 2018

Jay Myself is a movie starring Jay Maisel. Photographer Stephen Wilkes creates an intimate portrait of his mentor, Jay Maisel, as he leaves the 30,000 square foot building in the Bowery that he's inhabited and filled with his...

Starring
Jay Maisel
Genres
Biography, Documentary
Director
Stephen Wilkes

Disclaimer: This site does not store any files.

Product details

Audio English  Deutsch  Italiano  Español  Français  Gaeilge  Svenska  Nederlands
Subtitles 日本語  Čeština  Português  Australia  한국어  Filipino  Tiếng Việt  हिन्दी 
Quality 480p, 720p, 1080p, 2K, 4K
Genres Biography, Documentary
Director Stephen Wilkes
Writer Josh Alexander
Stars Jay Maisel
Country USA
Runtime 1H 19M
Description Photographer Stephen Wilkes creates an intimate portrait of his mentor, Jay Maisel, as he leaves the 30,000 square foot building in the Bowery that he's inhabited and filled with his eccentric collection of beautiful random objects for the last 40 years - known as 'The Bank.'

Top reviews

Sunday, 19 Jul 2020 18:07

As a film lover, it's a real treat to see documentaries that go right to the heart of what the films are about. I'll admit, the first 20 minutes or so of the film might be a little slow-paced, but once the story picks up, it's a pleasure to watch. The documentary has a unique idea that made me ask myself what's the point of seeing documentaries. I suppose I don't see the point of seeing the "raw" reality of the film-making process, where the focus is only on the "big picture" of what the director/producer/director/lead actor/etc. is doing. But when you know how to break the stereotypes, that's when the magic of documentaries begins. The same goes for every film. Sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn't. This one doesn't. It may be the "raw" reality of film-making, but it's also a "real" story, with a human-interest. What made me fall in love with this film was the juxtaposition of the actors' testimonies, with the "comparisons" of film-making, and the long-term human drama in the middle of the picture. It is rare that I've ever seen a documentary with a happy ending. The second thing that hooked me was the authenticity of the story. I don't want to give any of the secrets away, but if you're a filmmaker who has seen a lot of movies, you know how hard it is to achieve "creative freedom". I'm glad to know that this story was created by the producers of the film, and not the director/writer/producer/lead actor. The whole production team was truly so dedicated to the film. I never would have known this, if it weren't for the documentation of the interviews. I found myself feeling an empathy for the filmmakers, and a love for the story. It was a great documentary that hit home in every way. And although I've seen it 4 times now, the effect still holds true. The documentary ends with one of the most powerful statements I've heard in a long time. The theme is still there, but it's more poignant with each viewing. No matter how many times you watch the film, you won't forget it.


Write a review