SVT Play: All Systems Operational Normally

Watch Online Invisible Hands

(177) 8.1 80 min 2018

Invisible Hands is a movie starring Kailash Satyarthi, Ben Skinner, and Mark Barenberg. Invisible Hands is the first feature documentary that exposes child labor and child trafficking within the supply chains of the world's biggest...

Starring
Ben Skinner, Mark Barenberg, Kailash Satyarthi, Siddharth Kara
Genres
Documentary
Director
Shraysi Tandon

Disclaimer: This site does not store any files.

Product details

Audio English  Deutsch  Italiano  Español  Français  Gaeilge  Svenska  Nederlands
Subtitles 日本語  Čeština  Português  Australia  한국어  Filipino  Tiếng Việt  हिन्दी 
Quality 480p, 720p, 1080p, 2K, 4K
Genres Documentary
Director Shraysi Tandon
Writer Shraysi Tandon, Chad Beck
Stars Ben Skinner, Mark Barenberg, Kailash Satyarthi, Siddharth Kara
Country USA, Ghana, China, Indonesia, Hong Kong, India
Runtime 1H 20M
Description Invisible Hands is the first feature documentary that exposes child labor and child trafficking within the supply chains of the world's biggest corporations.

Top reviews

Monday, 31 Aug 2020 03:23

This is a well-done, thoughtful documentary that gives the viewer a "feel" for what it is like to be at the forefront of a medical decision. It is an attempt to re-establish the notion of honesty and integrity in medical practice, and to re-establish patient privacy. It's a necessary effort, and an honorable one. The film clearly shows the difficulties of the medical field, and of the ethical dilemmas that arise from them. It is an honor to be recognized by a leading group of medical professionals, and to have a dialog with them about what they do and how they do it. While this documentary makes an important statement about the medical field, it is also a warning to us all to be very careful about how we handle information. We must be very careful, for the data that is given in this documentary will be manipulated and turned into a bias. The main point that the documentary makes is that we must remember that people are dying for medical reasons, and that medical organizations are organized to achieve that goal. We must be careful about what we divulge to them, or to our patients. It is dangerous to know the truth. Those who defend the use of medical data for marketing purposes say that medical information is for the benefit of the individual. I believe that the information given in this film is not meant to be used for marketing purposes, but to help us understand why and how to help these patients. This documentary is a must see for anyone who is interested in the medical field, or in the ethical dilemmas that arise in it. Those who oppose the use of medical data for marketing purposes should watch this film to learn what it is like to be at the forefront of this practice, and to understand what is going on behind the scenes.
Saturday, 01 Aug 2020 01:00

An article I read in a local newspaper described this film as "the last major piece of journalistic journalism from the Vietnam war." So I decided to check it out. What I found was the most accurate account of what went on. This film is also the most impressive production I have ever seen. The production values are top notch. The music is wonderful. The performances are very good. And the story is so emotional and so important. So much so that I have not felt so much emotion about a movie since Saving Private Ryan. I have been watching this movie for the past two days. It has affected me deeply. It is very educational and educational. I have been having great conversations with my children, my neighbors, and even strangers in the parking lot. The power of this film will inspire you. You will be inspired by the people who are involved. You will feel for them. And then you will be moved by the amazing things they are doing. This is a powerful film that is worth watching more than once. It is the most powerful film I have ever seen. The performance of the actors are incredible. Every actor has brought their character to life. Even the children are outstanding. I have been saying all week that I am going to buy this movie because I have never seen anything like it. The only flaw in this movie is that it is a bit slow at times. I also felt that there were some scenes that needed to be longer. But all in all, this movie is one of the best films I have ever seen. It is a must see.
Wednesday, 29 Jul 2020 22:41

This is a fantastic documentary about the history of the shoot-em-up video game. It is a little slow to start with, but you'll want to get caught up. You'll laugh, you'll cry, you'll learn about the history behind these weapons. You'll find out that, although you may think that the weapons may have been invented for war, it is a passion for entertainment that runs deep in the history of the film. My favourite part of the film is the sound bite the boys say to the gun manufacturer. The gun makers are kind of repugnant to the point of humour, but they also seem very well aware of the dangers of video games. You see how they make a living from this, and they are really there to sell it. The creators are people who have made a business out of something that could really have been done without them. They are totally unaware that this game is part of a long history, they think they are just making a buck, but to the people who played these games, it is an amazing thing. The film is made in a very authentic way, very factual, very true, and it does not show the gamers in a negative light, not one single image, not a single image of any kind of violence. It is so very human. And it is very funny, and it is really moving. It was a little harder to find in the US than I thought it would be, but now it's on Netflix and it is awesome! The film will appeal to all video game enthusiasts, to those who have played games, and to those who have never played video games. It is a real eye-opener and it really does not show a side to video games that we normally don't get, it shows the passion and love of a team of men that make it what it is. I recommend it to everyone.


Write a review